The Samsung Galaxy S22 series could use vapor chambers to cool the insides of the handsets, using technology most commonly found in high-end gaming phones.

Not that Samsung is foreign to the use of vapor chambers in its flagships, but it has been implemented arbitrarily by being in the Samsung Galaxy S10 Plus, but not in its cheaper siblings (they have an “advanced heat pipe” system) as well as in installed some (but not all) of the Samsung Galaxy Note 20 and Note 20 Ultra phones.

Now, a new DigiTimes report suggests that Samsung is considering bringing back vapor chambers for its 2022 flagships, and while that’s still uncertain, it looks promising enough for Taiwanese suppliers to prepare for the phone maker’s mass-ordering event.

This probably means the flagship series Samsung Galaxy S22, but could also include other top models – for example, if there is a Samsung Galaxy Note 22 or a Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 4.

Do The Phones Really Need A Steam Room?

Vapor Chambers certainly sounded like the best mobile cooling situations, especially since they’re included in top gaming phones – the Asus ROG 3 even has a clear plastic section on the back to reveal the vapor chamber.

And while the vapor chambers cool phones, it’s not clear if they’re the only solution for top-of-the-line flagship phones. In fact, the Note 20 and Note 20 Ultra phones had multiple cooling systems that – seemingly coincidentally – were quietly implemented in both phone models. Some have copper vapor chambers, while others have graphite thermal pads that dissipate heat.

In a teardown investigative report, iFixit found that the systems seemed to be divided between phone models for no rhyme or reason. While the vapor chamber boast appeared to be a marketing boost that sold more units in previous S-series flagship phones, they may be prone to malfunction if damaged, an expert told the website. While graphite pads have reportedly appeared in the Samsung Galaxy Z Flip, this could mean the phone maker will introduce vapor chambers in its 2022 smartphones, without committing to one cooling technology over the other.

via